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Devastated by Tropical Storm Erika, Dominica calls on superyachts to help

The Commonwealth of Dominica is calling on the superyacht community to help it recover from the widespread damage caused by Tropical Storm Erika.

Tropical Storm Erika hit the tiny Caribbean island, which is only 289 square miles, last week (August 27). The storm killed 20 people and caused severe damage to homes and the island’s infrastructure. The island’s airport was also hit making it difficult for vital relief supplies to get to those in need. 

Compilation of Erika's Aftermath in Dominica

The president of the Dominica Marine Association, Hubert Winston, is asking the yachting community to help the island by bringing necessities.

“For yachts interested in bringing in supplies such as diapers, baby formula, baby bottles, bottled water, nonperishable food, dry food, school supplies, battery operated lamps, batteries, personal hygiene goods, and more, please notify the Dominica Marine Association before entering port so all Custom duties would be waived once you arrive,” Winston said.

For those who are not able to provide physical help, the Dominica Marine Association is also asking for monetary donations to the Dominica Tropical Storm Erika Relief Fund.

“All proceeds from this fundraiser will go directly to the Dominica Red Cross, the Dominica Marine Association water taxi efforts, and to the office of Disaster Management,” he added. "We would be grateful if you can find it in your heart to assist us in this great time of need.”

Superyachts are often called to the rescue in emergency situations. Earlier this year 73 metre yacht Dragonfly went to help cyclone-devastated Vanuatu.

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