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Every reader of Boat International enjoys the sea, whether being on it, working near it, designing for it, or merely reading about it. Yet more so than ever, our oceans are in peril.

Plastics, overfishing, pollution and human irresponsibility all mean the largest living space on earth is fast deteriorating. We at Boat International are committed to doing our bit to help, and our February issue is dedicated to ocean conservation and the people, projects, owners and builders working in this critical arena. Leading the way are the winners of our annual Ocean Awards. This year, thanks to the increase in the calibre and number of nominations, our judges, presided over by Blue Marine Foundation’s executive director Charles Clover, fell into heated debate. We hope you agree the ensuing winners and finalists are some of the most inspiring, brilliant and dedicated individuals working in the marine sphere today. There are too many heroes and heroines of ocean conservation to give an award every year, so we also endeavour to pay homage to some of the others via our “Ocean A-List”, comprising the great, the good, the famous and the unknown. 

The superyacht industry is also doing its bit, led by visionary owners who want to make as little impact as possible on the seas. Arcadia’s new 100, for example, has a roof made entirely of highly efficient solar cells, guaranteeing zero emissions while the yacht is at anchor. The brokerage and project management firm Y.CO, meanwhile, is working with crews to limit plastic waste on yachts. It’s no longer enough to rely on someone else; each of us has a responsibility if we want to ensure future generations can enjoy the oceans as much as we do now.

Sacha Bonsor
Editor-in-Chief

Stewart Campbell
Editor

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