icon-tableticon_arrow_downicon_arrow_lefticon_arrow_left_largeicon_arrow_righticon_arrow_right_largeicon_arrow_upicon_backicon_bullet_arrowicon_bullet_doticon_callicon_closeicon_close_largeicon_compareicon_facebookicon_favouriteicon_googleplusicon_grid_officon_grid_onicon_informationicon_instagramicon_menuicon_messageicon_minusicon_pinteresticon_plusicon_quote_endicon_quote_starticon_radio_onicon_refreshicon_searchicon_shareicon_staricon_tick_onicon_twittericon_video_play

Yogi: an exclusive look at the superyacht that sank in the Aegean Sea

In 2012 superyacht Yogi sank off Skyros, Greece when she was en route from Turkey to the Mediterranean after a warranty paint period. Before the sinking of Yogi, Boat International was given an exclusive look at the 60.2m  Proteksan Turquoise yacht.

Yogi – meaning practitioner of yoga – is Proteksan Turquoise’s largest yacht yet and affirms the yard’s intention to move into the larger section of customised superyachts. Yet this full-displacement steel and aluminium yacht does not resemble Proteksan’s previous builds. Designed by Jean Guy Verges, who has been working with Proteksan since the nineties, Yogi’s hull is quasi-expedition style and her sharp edges and straight lines are inspired by contemporary architecture. Her oversized portholes and windows bring in vast amounts of natural light and facilitate astonishing views on each of the four decks.

‘The idea,’ explains Verges, ‘was to have a yacht that could be chartered and run just like a resort, offering all you would expect in terms of leisure equipment and a pool, beach club, alfresco panoramic dining room, media and play room, as well as a wellness centre and luxury accommodation. ‘She has been designed to the specific requests of her owner,’ he adds. ‘I think this jewel offers more than you would expect of a yacht her size.’

Yogi’s layout is flowing and simple with large open spaces. Some statistics: the main saloon is more than 100 square metres; the dining room and lounge are 60 square metres; the owner’s suite is 75 and media/play lounge is 50. Needless to say, the yacht feels voluminous.

The interiors have been inspired by Balinese and Asian design, translated into a contemporary style using earthy shades and natural materials. Ceilings are finished with slate-effect panels with leather stitching, and the staircase has the same finish on its leather-panelled walls.

Details on Yogi are important: delicate touches are seen throughout, adding to the elegant yet understated effect. Fabric was supplied by high-end companies such as Nobilis, Jim Thompson and Pierre Frey with soft furnishings and lamps from Promemoria. New York-based photographer Michael Chen’s prints adorn the walls; decorative items are from Hermès Paris and there is custom furniture throughout. Guests can connect their iPhone or iPod to the centralised entertainment system, which also provides information and a vast library of music and movies for guests’ perusal.

The sun deck has an unusual layout and features a media/play lounge at the centre. Oversized windows on all sides create the feeling of floating over the sea, opening on to the aft sun deck through circular sliding doors. When the doors are open there is very much an alfresco feel for the guests who can relax in the shade on the curved sofas. Forward, up some stairs, is a raised dining area that can seat up to 14 guests. Aft, a spa pool for six is integrated into a large sun pad platform, overlooking the sea through the aft glass bulwark.

On the upper deck, the upper saloon also offers a place for dining with fantastic views: sliding doors enable guests to enjoy a formal alfresco dinner. In the saloon a five-metre sofa and comfortable armchairs continue the Zen feeling and floor-to-ceiling windows echo the design of the rest of the yacht.

Out on deck, a large sun pad with adjustable backrests provides a fantastic setting for evening movie watchers. The forward area of this deck is dedicated to the wheelhouse, finished in oak, black leather and dark grey lacquer. The captain’s and service crew cabins are also in this section, as is a pantry and service area.

The main deck is another spectacular space. There is a large pool with glass-bottomed floor, which spreads light through the water to the beach club below, while its glass overflow enhances the feeling of transparency. U-shaped sofas create an intimate space for relaxation. A set of sun pads separates the lounge and the pool area.

The main saloon is a beautifully tranquil zone. To port, a set of sofas and armchairs face a pair of chaise lounges and to starboard there is a great place to relax and read a book while feeling at the edge of the sea. Forward is the cinema area where guests can enjoy movies reclining on a four-metre custom sofa designed by JG Verges Design. The room is flooded with natural light through the 14 large floor-to-ceiling windows.

Forward is the owner’s and VIP lobby, with leather and wood marquetry walls. The VIP suite has an unusual starboard position with three floor-to-ceiling windows. The décor follows the same contemporary Asian style and features natural material such as stone, leather, oak wood, lacquer, fine silks and linen; a large en suite is reached through sliding doors.

Forward again is the owner’s private area. The full-width master has floor-to-ceiling windows, a leather and wooden desk and a chaise longue. The king-sized bed on the centreline faces a walk-in wardrobe, which provides ample storage as well as access to two en suites. To port, his has a large shower room and to starboard, hers a large bathtub and a television. The stone walls are finished with contrasting logo motifs, and natural light streams in through large windows.

Guest accommodation on the lower deck is provided in four suites –three double and one twin. Two of the cabins can be converted into one large suite by sliding back the wall panels. All have en suites finished in natural materials.

Aft, the beach club has a bar and massage room, panelled in teak, creating a warm cabana-style place to relax after a swim. A glass panel in the ceiling creates an interesting effect light into this room as light filters through the spa pool above. In many ways, Yogi challenges how superyachts are conceptually designed to be enjoyed.

Show all results for “%{term}