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11 of the best wreck dives

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B17 Bomber, Corsica

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B17-Bomber-wreck-Corsica

This wreck dive certainly stands out and provides divers with a totally unique experience. Resting 27 metres below the surface, the fascinating remains of a World War II B17 Bomber plane can be explored by advanced divers. The American aircraft was deployed in February 1944 for the purposes of destroying the railway system in Verona, which had been seized by the Germans. However, it never succeeded in its mission as it was damaged on the way. After being hit by Geman fighter pilots, captain Lieutenant Charplik was forced to make an emergency landing on water, consequently losing 4 men from his crew.

The impressive plane, which has a 32 metre wingspan, is in excellent condition. Divers will be able to clearly identify the pilot seats and aviation instruments, which have been left intact in the cockpit. The engines and remaining machine guns are another highlight of this fascinating dive.

The marine life is vibrant in this area, and divers may catch a glimpse of seahorses, stingrays or even dolphins while exploring the wreck. This is also an excellent opportunity to see live coral, such as brain coral and red and yellow gorgonian fans, which have made their home inside the plane.

This wreck is perfect for exploring if you leave your superyacht in the nearby port of Calvi, where the 60 metre Elysian was seen moored in July.

Pictures courtesy of Facebook.com / Denis Loctier

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MS Zenobia, Cyprus

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MS Zenobia, Cyprus

MS Zenobia has arguably had a longer career as a wreck than a functioning vessel. The 178 metre Swedish ferry sunk outside Larnaca, Cyprus on her maiden voyage in June 1980, just one stop from her final destination of Tartous in Syria. Technical problems were the cause of her demise and although the crew were evacuated safely prior to the sinking, MS Zenobia took almost £200 million worth of cargo down with her.

Fortunately, MS Zenobia and the 104 vehicles she was carrying have been well preserved, meaning that she now makes for an intriguing dive. Lying 42 metres below the surface, there is a multitude of marine life around the MS Zenobia and divers are most likely to spot moray eels, barracudas, jack fish and grouper fish. Advanced divers can explore the accommodation block, where part of the red tartan carpet can still be seen and the two full lorry decks. Though rusting, the lorries still have their windscreens and maintain the original paintwork on their cabs. MS Zenobia makes for a spectacular technical dive, with options for divers of varying levels.

The MS Zenobia shipwreck dive is located very close to Larnaca marina, which can accommodate yachts up to 49 metres.

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RMS Titanic, North Atlantic Ocean

600km south-southeast of Newfoundland

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Avid underwater explorers will be able to go on eight-day trips to the wreck of the RMS Titanic as of May 2018. Each trip will be open to just nine guests at a time and the group will fly by helicopter to the support yacht from St John's, Newfoundland.

After settling into the new environment and completing training sessions, groups of three will descend to the wreck in Cyclops 2. Made of titanium and filament-wound carbon fibre, it's the only manned submersible capable of reaching depths of up to 4,000 metres that is not owned by the government.

Cyclops 2 allows for 360 degree views of its surroundings with specialist lighting and cameras, meaning guests will be able to fully explore the wreck and the bizarre marine life that exists at these depths on each descent. They will spend approximately three hours exploring the wreck with a focus on the more intact bow section.

Each trip will be incredibly hands-on, as guests will help with dive preparations, review footage of the wreck, help to analyse data and take part in other mission specialist support roles.

OceanGate Expeditions has collaborated with Blue Marble Private to launch the Titanic Survey Expedition with an aim to eventually create a detailed 3D model of the wreck in addition to documenting her current condition and the surrounding ecosystem.

The RMS Titanic famously struck an iceberg and sank while en route to New York City from Southampton in April 1912. She now lies in two pieces with approximately 600 metres between them. The location of the wreck was not known until 1985, when a joint project led by Dr Robert Ballard of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Jean-Louis Michel of Ifremer (French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea) discovered what was left of the famous ship.

Pictures courtesy of Facebook.com & Instagram.com / OceanGate

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