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5 yacht designers discuss the evolution of lifestyle rooms

5 yacht designers discuss the evolution of lifestyle rooms

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Pascale Reymond

The market is mostly above the 80 metre mark

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From superyacht gyms and spas to cinemas and nightclubs, many rooms on modern superyachts are designed around the owner’s passions and the way they choose to live their life. As part of the new Boat International Media bookazine Futureyachts, which is out now, we asked some of the industry’s best-connected individuals to predict where this trend for lifestyle-specific rooms will go next.

Pascale Reymond of Reymond Langton Design argues that the market for these specialist rooms is principally above the 80 metre mark. “You can do special feature rooms on yachts under 65 metres, particularly a superyacht spa and an underwater room, and still have six suites, but the market is well above the 80 metre category.

“We have designed a host of fun, unusual special-purpose rooms on the new 98 metre Abeking & Rasmussen yacht Aviva, such as an indoor paddle tennis court,” she reveals.

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Jean-Jacques Coste

If you feel at home, you don't want to leave

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French naval architect Jean-Jacques Coste says lifestyle rooms add romance to the yachting experience and make owners more likely to spend time on board. “On my own yacht I’d want to have an art gallery or a nice beach club,” he explains. “It creates interest and a good way to live in communion with the sea. If you feel good and at home on your boat, you don’t want to leave.”

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Bannenberg & Rowell

Don't devote too much space to one use

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“If you are talking about new designs, it’s going to come from new lifestyles, new ways of using boats,” explains Dickie Bannenberg of Bannenberg & Rowell.

And the new ways owners want to use their boats — exploration or simply seeking out the last inch of privacy — is already influencing design, says co-founder Simon Rowell. “Even now, you see much more contemporary interiors, much more of a connection with the water and with the exterior decks.”

However, they caution against giving any space over entirely to any one use, which risks limiting future flexibility. This applies not just to lifestyle rooms but also for fairly standard features like dining saloons. Should they be given the heave-ho altogether? “That’s not for us to say,” says Bannenberg diplomatically. “But do you really need that sort of banquet space for 14 people?”

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