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5 ways to win the young designer of the year award

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Produce a design that can be built

Pictured: the first ever winning design, by Fadi Pataq

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how to win young designer of the year award

The design brief for the inaugural Young Designer of the Year Award specified a unique charter vessel with a low carbon footprint. The award, presented in 2008 at the World Superyacht Awards in Venice, Italy, went to Fadi Pataq for his 70.26m motor yacht concept, Pelagia. The judges singled this steel-aluminium design for its styling and engineering that clearly achieved the necessary balance between form and function.

Looking back, Fadi, who is now the Creative Director for superyacht builder Nobiskrug, says that the story behind his design – the packaging of various green technologies – made it a winner in the judges’ eyes. Pataq's design also stood out amongst the other entrants in that it was a viable design – one that not only possessed uniqueness in its styling but had the potential to be built.

_Winning Design: Pelagia, 70.26m steel/aluminium motor yacht

Designer/Year: Fadi Pataq/2008_

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Maximise the relationship with the sea

Pictured: 2010's winning design by Adam Voorhees

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how to win young designer of the year award

Within the parameters of a broad design brief that specified a regulated yacht fit for charter, the judges found Adam Voorhees' design of 66m Ra – which explored the transformability of space and interactions with light to reinforce the connection with the sea – to be not only imaginative, but one that would appeal to both owner and guest for its balance between interior and exterior spaces. They were particularly impressed by Voorhees’ clear understanding of the quality and enjoyment of life on the water.

Voorhees believes his design furthered the discussion about the relationships and interaction between exterior and interior, and had the potential to expose or refute the traditional yacht design process. ‘While my solutions were very conceptual in nature, they clearly explored the potential,’ he says. Voorhees has expanded upon this idea in his current work, where he strives to create through non-traditional methods. He says his primary area of interest lies in ‘modulating and controlling the interface between exterior and interior environments, which is directly related to the goal of maximising one’s enjoyment at sea.’

_Winning Design: Ra, 66m diesel/electric motor yacht

Designer/Year: Adam Voorhees/2010_

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3
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Draw timeless proportions

Pictured: Michael Givens' 2011 winning design

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how to win young designer of the year award

The brief for the 2011 Young Designer of the Year Award specified a yacht for first-time owners who wanted exterior deck spaces that could be used to the fullest. Michael Givens won for his design KT, a modern 76.8 metre motor yacht based on the classic styling of the 1930s. The large aft deck area afforded by the fantail design met the requirement for a large open entertainment area whilst the interior design specified high ceilings in the main-deck staterooms and large beach club, and upper decks that flowed into spacious exterior areas.

‘I am still extremely proud of the design,’ says Givens. ‘She is very modern yet incorporates a lot of classic elements including a fantail and long unbroken sheer.’

Givens explains that at the time of his submission there were few well executed new build classically styled yachts on the market and he felt the time was right for a new take on some old ideas. He also wanted to toy with a bow that was more vertical in its look without going to a full vertical straight line. The result was a very unique vessel that met the brief’s requirements and impressed the judges for its timeless design.

_Winning Design: KT, 76.8m fantail aluminium/composite motor yacht

Designer/Year: Michael Givens/2011_

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