icon-tablet icon_arrow_down icon_arrow_left icon_arrow_left_large icon_arrow_right icon_arrow_right_large icon_arrow_up icon_back icon_bullet_arrow icon_bullet_dot icon_call icon_close icon_close_large icon_compare icon_facebook icon_favourite icon_googleplus icon_grid_off icon_grid_on icon_information icon_instagram icon_menu icon_message icon_minus icon_pinterest icon_plus icon_quote_end icon_quote_start icon_radio_on icon_refresh icon_search icon_share icon_star icon_tick_on icon_twitter icon_youtube icon_video_play

Subscribe to our mailing list

Newsletter Preferences

Choose one or more newsletters
No, thanks

Passion for classic yachts

In today’s hurried world, ‘if it’s broken, replace it’ has become all too common a mantra. It seems we are obsessed with newer, bigger, faster. But perhaps we shouldn’t be too quick to dismiss their rivals. After all, it’s the older, slower, elegant ladies of the past that helped shape yachting’s future.

‘In the last 15 years, there’s been so much attention directed towards scale – the newest, biggest megayacht,’ says Marty Sutter, owner of the 1973 33m Burger Chanticleer and the 1930 33m Ted Geary-designed Canim.

‘We will never be the biggest yacht in the harbour, we certainly will not be the most expensive, but virtually everywhere we go, we’re the prettiest gal on the dance floor.

‘We do it because we like these boats, but owners might take note that a better way to distinguish yourself isn’t always bigger but more unique, more distinctive and certainly classic. And I think the owners of the classic boats who do maintain them well totally get that.’

While aesthetics and romanticism might be a common thread, yacht owners’ motivations for undertaking a significant classic restoration project are surprisingly varied

Passionate owners like Sutter have answered a classic calling, choosing to dedicate considerable time, money and effort towards restoring the magnificent craft of yesteryear. To them, the joy of restoring, maintaining and cruising these timeless beauties is worth more than the convenience of a new amenity-packed superyacht.

If anyone understands these owners, it would be Jim Moores, founder of restoration and refit specialist yards Moores Marine, Inc. and owner of the 1947 18.5m Trumpy Aurora II. Moores has completed more than 100 classic refits.

‘The main reason is dreams – people dream of a quieter, less complicated time,’ says Moores, ‘And it’s the beauty of these boats… I own a Trumpy, and it’s like a work of art. Many who designed these pre-war vessels were artists first and boatbuilders second.’

While aesthetics and romanticism might be a common thread, yacht owners’ motivations for undertaking a significant classic restoration project are surprisingly varied, as you will see in the following pages.

Loading content...
Show all results for “%{term}