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Sailing Yacht A's mainsail hoisted on second sea trials

New photos of Sailing Yacht A show the motor assisted sailing yacht with her mainsail aloft for the first time. The 142.81 metre Sailing Yacht A, currently in build for Russian yacht owner Andrey Melnichenko, is carrying out her second set of sea trials near to the Nobiskrug yard in Germany where she was built.

The new photo also shows the previously unseen central sail which bears Sailing Yacht A's emblem. Her record-breaking masts will now be thoroughly tested before her planned 2017 delivery. This news comes less than a week after Sailing Yacht A's exact delivery route was revealed.

In an exclusive with Boat International last year, full details of the boundary pushing technology of Sailing Yacht A and her true name were revealed. The sail-assisted motor yacht will be one of the world's largest superyachts when she is delivered next year.

The first aerial images of Sailing Yacht A emerged in March 2015, giving us a glimpse of her gargantuan dimensions and unique form. Indeed, she should prove to be just as much a head turner — if not more so — than owner Andrey Melnichenko’s iconic Motor Yacht A. Both vessels were styled by the renowned French designer Philippe Starck.

The yacht was technically launched in 2015, and the build has been shrouded in secrecy ever since. Dutch studio Dykstra Naval Architects designed the rig and keel, while Magma Structures in the UK built the carbon masts for Sailing Yacht A. Twin 4,827hp MTU diesel engines will give her a top speed of 21 knots, while her cruising speed of 16 knots should return a transatlantic range of 5,320 nautical miles.

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