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Exclusive: 6 facts about the build of Sailing Yacht A

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Sailing Yacht A Underwater Room
5

Glass technology on Sailing Yacht A

Germany’s GL Yachtverglasung (GLY) developed the yacht’s glass, including the longest piece of curved glass ever made: a 1.8-tonne, 15 metre bulwark forward on the bridge deck.

“The designer wanted to make the look as clean as possible and preferably without railings. The only way to make invisible railings was to make them out of glass,” explains Kloosterman.

Two other huge glass bulwarks are found on deck seven, at 11 metres in length, and forward of the owner’s deck, at 14 metres long. GLY also supplied three elliptical-shaped pieces for the underwater observation pod that is moulded into the keel. By using special GLY-MarineCobond interlayers during lamination, the company reduced the glass thickness and weight by as much as 50 per cent compared to typical windows.

Meeting Lloyd’s requirements that the underwater windows had to be tested at 10 times the working pressure took a bit of ingenuity. GLY built a steel tank and bolted on the observation pod windows then moved this assembly to Bodensee on the southern border of Germany and sunk it to the bottom of a 120 metre-deep hole to create the adequate pressures. The nearly foot-thick windows passed the test.

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