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The top 5 ways Project 75 reimagines superyacht design

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Project 75 Yacht On Water

The inside-out superyacht saves time in the design phase

What makes this 76.4 metre more than just another cool-looking concept is the innovative inside-out approach the team took. Instead of starting with a far-out exterior concept and working out the logistics, the naval architects and yacht managers designed the platform before the exterior designers even conceived what the yacht would look like.

"If you think of a standard design process, a client comes along, then finds a designer, the client then gives the designer the brief. It’s very client-centric, very fantastical sometimes,” says designer Rupert Mann. “The designer’s job is then to hone that, try to understand the brief and come up with a design at the conceptual stage that will work. Then the designer will work hand in glove with a naval architect.

“I think that often there’s a little bit of deconstruction that has to happen at that stage," Mann says. "You have to unwrap the concept slightly, deconstruct it, because the client has gotten a bit carried away or the designer has…”

“We stick reality in there,” says Robert Skarda from Steller Systems, who is providing naval architecture on Project 75.

“There’s a bit of lost time there, it’s not efficient,” Mann says.

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